Dancing in the Street

A Tribute to Contemporary Black Music.

Summer’s Here (OK NOT QUITE) 

AND THE TIME IS RIGHT…..

FOR NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL 2019

 

Carnival is just around the corner, and have we got a treat for you, come and celebrate with us!

Our 2019 theme is Dancing in the Street: A tribute to Contemporary Black Music. We are paying tribute to the rich melanin culture across the board, these artists have given us Jazz, Motown, Samba, Reggae, Funk, Pop and Rock right up to the present day with artists such as Beyoncé.

Too many to name in one parade, this is but a snapshot of a larger movement that shaped music as a whole. The fashion, dance forms, lifestyle and fight against oppression empowered us all to move to the enchanting sound wave that we call, Music. This is for the trailblazers, rebels and the powerful influences they have had on music today,
we thank them . 

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Countdown to Carnival!

 

**EARLY BIRDS**

One-off Early Bird Prices until the 3rd of June.
Pay 50% to secure your early bird special edition price and pay the rest within a month and half.

 

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ALAs

Commisão de frente

“Dancing in the Street”

Our front commission presents you with the infamous track by Martha and the Vandallas; later covered by Jagger and Bowie. Like many black artists before them, they were the among the first to bring their music to white audience, breaking down cultural and racial barriers. Think glamourous girl groups from the 60s.

Mestre Sala & Porta Bandeira

“Rebel Music”

This track from Bob Marley asks the question “Why can’t we be what we want to be?” Reggae music is for many, an instrument of political rebellion. The main ideology is radical social change. Bob Marley’s rebellious songs are a declaration of resistance against the systematic dehumanization of oppressed peoples across the globe. Olodum took on the colours of reggae and a peace symbol for their style of Samba Reggae, celebrating African roots as part of the movimento negro (or Black Movement), forming a Bloco Afro comprised entirely of black drummers and dancers.

ALA DAS BIANAS

“No No No”

This track from Bob Marley asks the question “Why can’t we be what we want to be?” Reggae music is for many, an instrument of political rebellion. The main ideology is radical social change. Bob Marley’s rebellious songs are a declaration of resistance against the systematic dehumanization of oppressed peoples across the globe. Olodum took on the colours of reggae and a peace symbol for their style of Samba Reggae, celebrating African roots as part of the movimento negro (or Black Movement), forming a Bloco Afro comprised entirely of black drummers and dancers.

BATERIA

“Mothership Connection (Star Child)”

George Clinton’s Parliament and Funkadelic heavily influenced music today with a blend of funk and rock. We pay tribute to Bootsy Collins, for his style and his BASS! Tear the roof off and beam us back up to the Mothership!

 

Intermediate- advance skill only. Please contact lssbateria@gmail.com

 

ala dos Passistas

 “It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing!”

New Orleans’ Storyville, a notorious Red-Light district, is home to the brothels and bars that provided the only venues for jazz, since African American performers were banned from performing at white clubs. Think bold, racy, illegal, prohibited!

– Malandras, female pimps
– Malandros, green suits, looking crisp! 

Ala dance

“Purple Rain”

Released in 1984, the same year as LSS’s beginnings, Purple Rain remains to this day the track best associated with Prince. The album of the same name became gold in the same year.

 

Think purple, sexy, gender bending, camp..